RomneyFam

Ann Romney Never Worked a Day in Her Life?

Raising children is work.  But Democratic Strategist Hilary Rosen  claims that Ann Romney “actually never worked a day in her life.” Talk about putting women down. Right after she claimed that the phrase, “war on women” is not put out there by the Democratic party, she goes to war, firing at Ann Romney. This is not about getting birth control or abortions. This is about not respecting a woman’s work in raising five sons. Isn’t it all about choice?


Hilary has a very narrow view of what makes a woman worthy of her praise. How very shallow and condemning. She continued her mocking,  adding that Mitt Romney “just seems so old fashioned when it comes to women.”


I think if you ask many women who have worked in the workplace and have also worked at home raising kids, they will tell you that raising kids fulltime is harder than going to work. There is no coffee break, no lunch break, you work when you are sick and tired and you remain calm and pleasant and sleep deprived. I know. I raised five kids.


Many of us that have taken on that job have had to struggle with health problems along the way. Ann  Romney has MS and has had breast cancer. Sometimes, the job is so demanding that you can become physically ill. But women push through. We get no salary, no pension, no worker’s comp while raising the next generation. There is no respect for a mother, especially for a stay-at-home mother. The only respect the press gives a woman is when she fights for birth control and has a full time career, and the more prestigious, the better.
Young Ann Romney — being a mom:
Ann Romney’s Five sons and Mitt:

The Dividends of Motherhood:

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05969217675340711841 dgenetaylor

    Is that the same hose Mitt used to wash down the family station wagon after the infamous dog incident?
    Yea, stay-at-home moms just sit around eating bon-bons all day.
    So they’re going to call Mitt “old fashion.”

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06814109921379333571 Deila Taylor

    More like cleaning up bon-bons. I like those little ice cream bon bons — they’re perfect bribes for the kids, while I sit on the sofa. hehe.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06019413665136390175 Rozy Lass

    Thank God for “old-fashioned” men who marry and then provide for their wife and children, protecting them and allowing them to flourish in a safe environment. Thank God for women who stay home and give up the praise and paycheck of the workplace to do a more eternally important work. Satan’s attacks are so blatant!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/00131723337404316867 RoeH

    Yeah – I watched that. Fools just cannot keep their mouths shut. And besides, she’s probably eating crow today cause I think I heard on the tv at the gym that even Obama said the comment wasn’t necessary. Now who looks foolish. Any ideas, Hil???

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14480522255028503327 Debbie

    You make a point with regard to women having a choice however, Ann Romney is also incredibly wealthy. When a woman has to work full-time, raise a family, make ends meet, cook/clean, run a house, take care of kids, and deal with the same issues with regard to illnesses such as breast cancer, MS, diabetes, and do not have the opportunity to choose the best of the best with regard to health care and doctors, and then do it all on a pittance of what Ann Romney is used to living on, that is the point that Hilary Rosen was trying to make. We don’t live in the 1950′s anymore and the days where a man felt less of a man because his wife has to work are long gone. Today both parties have to work. If you consider that the average American household income is something like $40,000 a year, that’s not a whole lot of money to raise a family on and is probably less than what Ann Romney spent on her last car.

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06814109921379333571 Deila Taylor

      I hope that does not describe your situation–

      I am thinking that the news reported that Michelle Obama spent $50,000 on lingerie — the price of a car — We can point fingers, but we cannot really judge what is in another woman’s heart, be it Michelle or Ann. I feel that it was harsh for Rosen to slam another woman that way. ( women can be a bit back stabbing) She could have said it differently, true. We all have trials, for some of us, it is not enough money, some have too much, some heartache, some health issues, it goes on. This life is not a fantasy life — I feel like Woody allen when he says there are the terrible and the horrible.

      But Ann Romney is trying to reach out to women and listen to them, and that is to her credit. She should not be condemned because her husband made good money and bought her a nice car. I think we can have compassion without experience. although experience does bring it home. Blah. The Romneys have given more to charity than many people — 15% or 7 million over 2 years, that is commendable.

      thx for your thoughts.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05969217675340711841 dgenetaylor

    Debbie, Ms. Rosen should have said Ann Romney can’t comment on the economy because she’s wealthy, and therefore she’s out of touch with real life, especially the modern normative household, where both parents work, etc. and have adversity without wealth. Before commenting, did I get your sentiment correct?
    I do think that’s what Ms. Rosen intended with her remark? Do you agree?

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14480522255028503327 Debbie

      Yes, that is how I understood it. I do not want begrudge anyone their good fortune and success. However, the country is in a terrible crises with regard to outsourcing and layoffs and basically, no work. I am 55 and this is the second layoff I’ve experienced since 2008. I have always, always worked and would never have imagined that in my mid-50′s I would would be unemployed. The last time I was out of work it took me two years to find a job. A very, very difficult prospect in today’s world where everything is done on-line. Employers do not want to meet you, see you, hear from you. It really is a “don’t call us, we’ll call you” situation. I am a legal secretary and have worked at some of the most prestigious law firms in the world, and I cannot get a job. I don’t know if I will work in six months, another year, or ever again. I’m too young to retire and could not afford it financially nor without medical insurance. And, trying to garner work in your mid-50′s is something you’d have to experience to understand. I am sure than Ann Romney is a lovely woman, really and truly, however there is no way that she or her husband can relate to the people in this country who have suffered job losses, etc., through no fault of their own. I don’t think that Hilary Rosen said anything other than state a fact. Many women in this country would love to be able to stay home and raise their children but they can’t. Ann has been very, very fortunate. I believe I have been fortunate as well. I am going though a difficult time right now and God only knows when this trial will end, but I’m certain it will. Eventually.

      I appreciate your thoughtful response to my comment.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05969217675340711841 dgenetaylor

    Debbie, I want to comment on your thoughts, without conflicting; with the idea of offering additional perspective. Hilary Rosen will do better next time when phrasing her criticism of the Romney family. In fact, we should expect that general theme as a means of saying that the super wealthy–this picture-perfect wife and family, are out of touch with you, the people, the common man, the folks–so don’t vote for him–or for them. Because they will help the wealthy class–their own people–but they can’t help you, because they can’t relate. They don’t understand your plight. This will be a major political issue for the next 6-months, and therefore, it is worth beginning to think about now; very seriously.

    Stereotypes are useful in helping us understand the world. And that is why this particular charge can stick–the image of the detached wealthy person. Because most of us have known someone who fits that stereotype–the wealthy man who doesn’t care about the plight of the common man; if not personally, then from the portrayals in modern popular culture, i.e., The Titanic. The common cultural message is that the super-wealthy can’t be empathetic; they can’t have sympathy; they can’t be wise, etc., because they are negatively impacted by the privileges of wealth. It is possible to go very deep into this subject; and I’m interested in this line of reasoning, because wealth can have very negative impacts on the human psyche.

    I’m not trying to trap anyone with my ironclad logic. However, it should be obvious that not all the super-wealthy fit some negative stereotype. That would be the same as saying that all poor people, who make only $40,000 per year are, what, (you fill in pejorative.)

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14480522255028503327 Debbie

      I believe that most politicians do not really care about the vast majority of America. Not in the way that they should or the way that some some Americans believe they do. Right/Left … Republican/Democrat, in truth, there isn’t a party that represents me. I am not illiterate and poor, nor am I wealthy. I am a worker, who is out of work. Is there anyone to blame for that? Was it my performance? The company needing more profit? Downsizing? These are the frustrations of those who have lost their jobs and who have been unemployed for over two years, and this is the fear that workers live with daily … will I be layed off? The American worker has no security and I believe that is really un-American. In my humble opinion.

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05969217675340711841 dgenetaylor

      Debbie, thank you for sharing your story. I am so sorry you are struggling. Truthfully, I do understand your pain; more than you may possibly imagine. I sincerely pray that Lord will reach out and rescue you from this severe trial. Not having work when you need it desperately is so difficult.
      Father, bless this women, and deliver her from financial bondage, is my prayer.

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14480522255028503327 Debbie

      THANK YOU SO MUCH FOR YOUR PRAYER. I truly, truly appreciate it.

      God Bless …

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/05969217675340711841 dgenetaylor

    Let’s look at the model for super wealth. God is said to have all power, all knowledge, and therefor all wealth. Do I need to continue? God is also said to be all good, and all love.
    The model of the benevolent king, or the benevolent Lord of the manor, the keeper of the loaf (the loafward=lord) is one who is a wise steward, who cares for his subjects, with wisdom and with charity, etc. You can watch the Downton Abbey series to see the model for a relatively kind Lord of the manor, who sees himself as a steward for his family, through many generations, who has the “responsibility” and the “honor” to care for the lands and the people under his charge.

    I don’t know the Romney family personally. I do think we need the example of a wealthy family who have very benevolent motives.
    Because we have had so may examples (real and imaginary) of the other, the negative stereotype–super wealthy people without empathy.

    One last thought: wealth can’t protect people from the vicissitudes of life. Some personal stories: my wife’s family were very wealthy; her Dad was the founder of a restaurant chain with 160 units; his net worth was about $70 million (a piker, by some standards, but well above that $40k per year mentioned.) He employed 5,000 people. And yet, (or because) he would call me in the middle of the night, sometimes, with the night-sweats, and a racing heart, filled with fear; various fears–one was that people would just stop coming to his restaurants, and what that would mean–all the families who depended on his wisdom to do the right thing–to make the right moves–to keep it all working. And eventually it did happen; people did stop coming; and one day it all changed from being a cash-cow into being a huge debt. Its pretty scary stuff. But if you saw JB in the daytime, you would never have know about his night-sweats that almost caused him his life from a racing-heart that could have cramped–since that’s what a heat-attach is–a cramp in the heart muscle.

    From my own family, my sister would have been classified as wealthy my many; she and her husband both worked for 6-figure salaries; they had the house in Groton and the summer house in Main, on an island. And yet, my sister is not with us any more. Wealth cannot buy life. Ask Steve Jobs what the very best in health care can buy.
    The vicissitudes of life have a way of teaching empathy, even to the super-wealthy. Even Ann Romney is likely to have sat up all night with a sick child, with difficulty breathing.
    These life experiences tend to soften some of us, while other may be made hard. My feeling is that the Romney people are wise, and yet their hearts have been softened through key experiences. For example, look for the story, not widely known, about the time Mitt was driving the car, in France, that was hit head on. He was pronounced dead at the scene, but survived. We generally don’t know what life experiences have been at work, shaping the individual; the wealthy, and poor, and the middle class alike.

    • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14480522255028503327 Debbie

      Agreed. We each have a purpose and a journey. Our life circumstances form who we become and hopefully, what we learn and take with us when we leave here. Money cannot buy love or health, it is true. I am an average working person, I am not wealthy but if I had money (not gazillions) but enough to feel my retirement years will be comfortable where I don’t have to share cat food with the cat, I would probably not worry so much. My husband works very hard and I feel bad that I am unable to contribute.

      And you are correct about none of us knowing what life experiences have been at work in anyone’s life. I have heard people say terrible things about the unemployed as if it is our fault. But I remain faithful/hopeful.

      It has been nice conversing with you. Truly.

  • UW81

    Interesting that you say that only mothers really work full time and that the women who do work get lunch breaks, coffee breaks etc. I work full time and I work through lunch every single day. In fact I walk down the hall to pick up my students from recess while finishing my lunch. At recess I’m tutoring students who are behind and after school I tutor more students. Clearly since you haven’t been in the work force, you don’t understand what it’s like for many people just as many people don’t understand what it’s like to be a stay at home mom. Have you ever looked at the other side of the coin? It sure doesn’t sound like you have!

  • http://www.eveoutofthegarden.com/ deila

    Actually, I have worked fulltime, before I had children. Raising kids is a hard job, full-time. You never really have time off, even at night, when you should be able to sleep, children wake you up.

  • Chuck Thomas

    Ann Romney had the benefit of wealth in raising her children. She did not share the burden of working a low paying job; finding affordable child-care or a relative to watch her children or have to do the housework and cooking by herself. She had HELP.
    This is what the Hilary Rosen meant. Ever watch a wealthy housewife raise her children? A facade. The raping of the working middle class wealth was stolen by the wealthy elite, who, rather than create jobs and manufacturing, hoarded it without cause nor concern for their fellow compatriots who suffered as a result.