I’ve searched for some of Joseph Smith’s dreams, looking for primary sources. The recorded dreams and their sources follow.

Source: An American Prophet’s Record: The Diaries and Journals of Joseph Smith, edited by Scott H. Faulring —

1. One day after Joseph Smith (in Kirtland, Ohio) sees in vision the Celestial Kingdom, January 21, 1836, (recorded by Warren Parish — now D&C 137), Joseph records after a long day of meetings on  Jan 22, 1836,

I then observed to the brethren that it was time to retire. We accordingly /closed/ our interview and returned home at about 2 o’clock in the morning. The spirit and visions of God attended me through the night. (An American Prophet’s Record: The Diaries and Journals of Joseph Smith, edited by Scott H. Faulring, p. 121)

2. The wording, may imply that these were visions and not dreams. Though it may be similar, I would term a vision happening in a waking state, not sleeping. This was a time when the Lord poured out many visions and miraculous events. And Joseph records, on Jan 28, 1836, more specifically that he had dream visions:

..I f[e]lt to praise God with a loud hossannah for His goodness to me and my father’s family and to all the children of men. Praise the Lord all ye His Saints, Praise His Holy Name. After these quorems were dismissed I retired to my home filled with the spirit and my soul cried hossannah to God and the Lamb through /the/ silent watches of the night and while my eyes were closed in sleep the visions of the Lord were sweet unto me and his glory was round about me. Praise the Lord.{page 144} (ibid. p. 124)

3. On the 27th of December 1842, Joseph leaves for trial in Springfield, Ill, having been assured of safety by Gov. Ford. About 40 men travel with him. On Dec 28, 1842, Willard Richards, writing as secretary for Joseph’s diary, records:

Started at 8 o’clock. (Sis[ter] Durphy’s daughter tarried and Bro[ther] W[illia]m Smith, wife, and little daughter accompanied). Before starting Joseph related his [dream]. Was by a beautiful stream of water. Saw a noble handsome fish. Threw it out. Soon after saw more, threw them out and soon a great many and threw them out a great abundance, and sent for salt to salt them down and salted them. (ibid. p. 259)

4. Later, in Nauvoo, on January 18, 1843, Willard Richards recorded another dream of Joseph’s. This was probably in regards to a letter that Joseph read to a dinner group in Nauvoo from John C. Bennett to Orson Pratt and Sidney Rigdon dated Jan. 10, 1843,

…stating that [Jacob B.} Backenstows {page 134} was soon going to have Joseph arrested on the old score from M[iss]o[uri] and for Murder &c. Mr Pratt shewed Joseph the Letter. Mr. Rigdon did not want to have it known that he had any hand in showing the letter. Joseph said he had sent word to Gov[ernor] Ford by Backensto[s] that before he would be troubled any more by M[iss]o[uri] he would fight first.

Dreamed that a sheriff came after me [Joseph]. A man put a musket in my hand and told me to keep him [the sheriff]. I took the musket and walked around him. When he went to go away, I would push him back and if others came to trouble him I would keep them off. (Ibid. p. 293)

5. Then in Jan 20, 1843, Joseph gave instruction about writing the history of the church and shared one of his dreams:

Joseph told his dream in council[:] I dreamed this morning that I was in the Lobby of the Representative House at Springfield when some of the members who did not like my being there began to mar and cut and pound my shins with pieces of Iron. I bore it as long as I could, then Jumped over the rail into the hall, caught a rod of Iron and went at them cursing and swearing at them in the most awful manner and drove them all out of the house. I went to the door and told them to send me a clerk and I will /would/ make some laws that would do good. There was quite a collection around the /State/ house trying to raise an army to take me and there were many horses tied around the square. I thought they would not have the privilege of getting me so I took a rod of Iron and mowed my way through their way /ranks/, looking after their best race horrse thinking they might catch me when the[y] could find me when I was awoke.

To dream of flying signifies prosperity and deliverence from Enemies. Swimming in deep water signifies success among Many people. The word will be accompanied with power. Told Elder Hyde when he spoke in the name of the Lord, it should prove true, but do not curse the people…Elder Hyde told of the excellent white wine he drank in the east [Palestine]. Joseph prophesied in the name of the Lord that he would drink wine with him in that country. (Ibid. p. 293-4)

6. Mar 11, 1843

…A dream then related. Night before last I [Joseph] dreamed that an /old/ man came to me /and said/ there was a mob force coming upon him, and he was likely to loose his life, that I was Lieut[enant] General and had the command of a large force. I was also a patriot and disposed to protect the innocent and unoffending and wanted I should assist him. I told him I wanted some written documents to show the facts that they are the agressors, and I would raise a force sufficient for his protection, that I would call out the Legion. He turned to go from me, but turned again and said to me. “I have any amount of men at my command and will put them under your command.”…(ibid. p. 332)

7. Mar 15, 1843

Dream, last night dreamed of swimming in a river of pure water, clear as crystal, over a school of fish of the largest /size/ I ever saw. They were directly under my belly. I was astonished and felt afraid they might drown me or do me injury. They were the largest I ever saw. (ibid. p. 333)

Source: The Words of Joseph Smith by Joseph Smith by Andrew F. Ehat and Lyndon W. Cook:

On April 2, 1843 (Sunday Afternoon). Ramus, Illinois. This dream was recorded by William Clayton and Willard Richards.

2 Apr 1843 (Sunday Afternoon) Ramus, Illinois — William Clayton Diary:

[Joseph Smith] …He [Joseph] also related the following dream. “I dreamed that silver-headed old man came to see me and said he was invaded by a gang of robbers, who were plundering his neighbors and threatening distruction to all his subjects. He had heard that I always sought to defend the oppressed, and he had come to hear with his own ears what answer I would give him. I answered, if you will make out the papers and shew that you are not the agressor I will call out the Legion and defend you while I have a man to stand by me. The old man then turned to go away. When he got a little distance he turned suddenly round and said I must call out the Legion and go and he would have the papers ready when I arrived, and says he I have any amount of men which you can have under your command.
[Note: the above paragraph is crossed through with a penciled line and at the beginning in handwriting that is not William Clayton’s, a comment simply says “repeated his of 10 March.” ]
Er Hyde gave this interpretation “The old man represents the government of these United States who will be invaded by a foreign foe, probably England. The U. S. government will call on you to defend probably all this Western Territory, and will offer you any amount of men you may need for that purpose. (The Words of Joseph Smith by Joseph Smith by Andrew F. Ehat and Lyndon W. Cook, p.

Joseph Smith Diary, by Willard Richards:

–related the Dream written on page 3d Book B Interpretation By O. Hyde–[The dream referred to is located at the beginning of the second volume of Joseph Smith’s Diary under th date 11 March 1843 and is as follows:]

A dream, then related. Night before last I [Joseph] dreamed that an /old/ man came to me /and said/ there was a mob force coming upon him, and he was likely to loose his life, that I was Lieut[enant] General and had the command of a large force. I was also a patriot and disposed to protect the innocent and unoffending and wanted I should assist him. I told him I wanted some written documents to show the facts that they are the agressors, and I would raise a force sufficient for his protection, that I would call out the Legion. He turned to go from me, but turned again and said to me. “I have any amount of men at my command and will put them under your command.” [Then follows the ] Interpretation by O. Hyde–

old man. –Government of these United States, who will be invaded by a foreign foe. probably England. U.S. Government will call on Gen Smith to defend probably all this western territory and offer him any amount of men he shall desire & put them under his command. (The Words of Joseph Smith by Joseph Smith by Andrew F. Ehat and Lyndon W. Cook, p. 172)

Source:  History of the Church:

In early February 1844, four months prior to his death, Joseph Smith had a dream, which he
related to Wilford Woodruff, Willard Richards, and W. W. Phelps, Friday, Feb. 2, 1844:

Prayer-meeting at Elder Brigham Young’s. Weather cold.

I went into the assembly room, where I found Elders Wilford Woodruff, Willard Richards, and W. W. Phelps, to whom I related the following dream, which Elder Willford Woodruff reported:

The Prophet’s Dream—Troubled Waters Overcome.

I was standing on a peninsula, in the midst of a vast body of water where there appeared to be a large harbor or pier built out for boats to come to. I was surrounded by my friends, and while looking at this harbor I saw a steamboat approaching the harbor. There were bridges on the pier for persons to cross, and there came up a wind and drove the steamboat under one of the bridges and upset it.

I ran up to the boat, expecting the persons would all drown; and wishing to do something to assist them, I put my hand against the side of the boat, and with one surge I shoved it under the bridge and righted it up, and then told them to take care of themselves. But it was not long before I saw them starting out into the channel or main body of the water again.

The storms were raging and the waters rough. I said to my friends that if they did not understand the signs of the times and the spirit of prophecy, they would be apt to be lost.

It was but a few moments after when we saw the waves break over the boat, and she soon foundered and went down with all on board.

The storm and waters were still very rough; yet I told my friends around me that I believed I could stem those waves and that storm, and swim in the waters better than the steamboat did; at any rate I was determined to try it. But my friends laughed at me, and told me I could not stand at all, but would be drowned.

[Page 195]

The waters looked clear and beautiful, though exceedingly rough; and I said I believed I could swim, and I would try it anyhow. They said I would drown. I said I would have a frolic in the water first, if I did; and I drove off in the raging waves.

I had swam but a short distance when a towering wave overwhelmed me for a time; but I soon found myself on the top of it, and soon I met the second wave in the same way; and for a while I struggled hard to live in the midst of the storm and waves, and soon found I gained upon every wave, and skimmed the torrent better; and I soon had power to swim with my head out of water: so the waves did not break over me at all, and I found that I had swam a great distance; and in looking about, I saw my brother Samuel by my side.

I asked him how he liked it. He said, “First rate,” and I thought so too. I was soon enabled to swim with my head and shoulders out of water, and I could swim as fast as any steamboat.

In a little time it became calm, and I could rush through the water, and only go in to my loins, and soon I only went in to my knees, and finally could tread on the top of the water, and went almost with the speed of an arrow.

I said to Samuel, See how swift I can go! I thought it was great sport and pleasure to travel with such speed, and I awoke. (Joseph Smith, History of the Church, 6:194–95)

Joseph Smith’s last recorded dream occurred on June 26, 1844 while he was in the Carthage Jail, the last night of the Prophet’s life. He was killed the next day, June 27.

Joseph related the following dream which he had last night:

The Prophet’s Dream of his Kirtland Farm

“I was back in Kirtland, Ohio, and thought I would take a walk out by myself, and view my old farm, which I found grown up with weeds and brambles, and altogether bearing evidence of neglect and want of culture. I went into the barn, which I found without floor or doors, with the weather-boarding off, and was altogether in keeping with the farm.

“While I viewed the desolation around me, and was contemplating how it might be recovered from the curse upon it, there came rushing into the barn a company of furious men, who commenced to pick a quarrel with me.

“The leader of the party ordered me to leave the barn and farm, stating it was none of mine, and that I must give up all hope of ever possessing it.

“I told him the farm was given me by the Church, and although I had not had any use of it for some time back, still I had not sold it, and according to righteous principles it belonged to me or the Church.

[Page 610]

“He then grew furious and began to rail upon me, and threaten me, and said it never did belong to me nor to the Church.

“I then told him that I did not think it worth contending about, that I had no desire to live upon it in its present state, and if he thought he had a better right I would not quarrel with him about it but leave; but my assurance that I would not trouble him at present did not seem to satisfy him, as he seemed determined to quarrel with me, and threatened me with the destruction of my body.

“While he was thus engaged, pouring out his bitter words upon me, a rabble rushed in and nearly filled the barn, drew out their knives, and began to quarrel among themselves for the premises, and for a moment forgot me, at which time I took the opportunity to walk out of the barn about up to my ankles in mud.

“When I was a little distance from the barn, I heard them screeching and screaming in a very distressed manner, as it appeared they had engaged in a general fight with their knives. While they were thus engaged, the dream or vision ended.” (Joseph Smith, History of the Church, 6:609–10)

Source:  Waiting for World’s End, The Diaries of Wilford Woodruff, Edited by Susan Staker:

After Joseph was killed, Wilford Woodruff recorded one of Joseph’s dreams in his journal on July 16, 1844:

16th … I then went to the Post Office & took out a letter directed to G. A. Smith written mostly by his wife. Mrs Woodruff wrote a few lines in it to me the first intelligence I had from her since I left home. She related the following dream that Joseph Smith had a few days before he sealed + his testimony with his blood, about Wm. & Wilson Law:

“He thought they bound him and cast him into prision a pit or well as Joseph was anciently. He struggled hard & got up so he could look out & he saw the Laws a little distance off one of them in the hands /grasp/ of a tiger & the other a snake. They called to him to come & help them. He told them they had bound him & they could not. He thought a brother soon came along & took him out of the pit. …”  (Waiting for World’s End, The Diaries of Wilford Woodruff, Edited by Susan Staker, p. 76-77.)

 

References:

Waiting for World’s End, The Diaries of Wilford Woodruff, Edited by Susan Staker

An American Prophet’s Record: The Diaries and Journals of Joseph Smith, edited by Scott H. Faulring

(the above are Amazon affiliate links)

 History of the Church, Joseph Smith (online or Deseret Book paperback)

 

 

Angel drawing for the original Nauvoo Temple

Joseph Smith addresses the Nauvoo Legion